Construction worker discovers massive 11-pound MAMMOTH WOOL tooth at Iowa construction site

An Iowa construction worker made a ‘once in a lifetime’ discovery when he found a huge woolly mammoth tooth while working on the site of a community college, thanking his two sons and their love of dinosaurs for giving him the knowledge to identify the fossil.

Father-of-two Justin Blauwet came across the rare remnant on March 4 while conducting construction observations for the company he works for, DGR Engineering, on property owned by Northwest Iowa Community College in Sheldon , DNG said in a press release.

Blauwet spotted the 11.2-pound woolly mammoth tooth lying on the ground, clearly exposed during the excavation and said he was able to identify the tooth due to its interest in fossils and prehistoric animals.

The woolly mammoth roamed the frozen tundra of Europe and North America for 140,000 years, disappearing at the end of the Pleistocene, 10,000 years ago.

They are one of the best understood prehistoric animals known to science because their remains are often not fossilized but frozen and preserved.

Justin Blauwet (pictured) made a ‘once in a lifetime’ discovery while observing the construction of a lifting station project for DGR Engineering

The massive molar measures 11 inches by 7 inches by 4 inches and weighs 11.2 pounds

The massive molar measures 11 inches by 7 inches by 4 inches and weighs 11.2 pounds

In fact, the father credited his two sons, who grew up to have a great interest in dinosaurs, with the discovery aid.

“I’m a ‘nerd’ like that,” he joked.

The massive molar measures 11 inches by 7 inches by 4 inches and weighs 11.2 pounds.

‘This is an upper 3rd molar, probably a right one. Based on the degree of wear, this animal was likely in his early 30s when he died,’ said Chris Widga, chief curator at East Tennessee State University.

The tooth is estimated to have been underground since the last glacial maximum 20,000 years ago.

According to Tiffany Adrain, repository instructor of paleontology at the University of Iowa, finding the tooth in such good condition was “lucky”

“Although the discovery of mammoth remains is not uncommon in Iowa, once the bones and teeth are exposed, they can crumble and disappear quickly because they are not fully fossilized. It was a happy find,” she said.

The tooth (pictured) is believed to have been underground since the last glacial maximum 20,000 years ago

The tooth (pictured) is believed to have been underground since the last glacial maximum 20,000 years ago

The woolly mammoth roamed the frozen tundra of Europe and North America for 140,000 years, disappearing at the end of the Pleistocene, 10,000 years ago.

The woolly mammoth roamed the frozen tundra of Europe and North America for 140,000 years, disappearing at the end of the Pleistocene, 10,000 years ago.

Although Blauwet was the one to find it, the tooth belongs to NCC, who plan to donate it to the Sheldon Prairie Museum, (pictured) where it will be displayed and kept.

Although Blauwet was the one to find it, the tooth belongs to NCC, who plan to donate it to the Sheldon Prairie Museum, (pictured) where it will be displayed and kept.

Although Blauwet discovered it, the tooth belongs to NCC, which plans to donate it to the Sheldon Prairie Museum, where it will be displayed and preserved.

‘NCC already has many ties to its communities forged over the past half-century. When Blauwet discovered this woolly mammoth tooth, she discovered an even deeper connection – a connection that now connects our campus property to the prehistoric era of retreating glaciers,’ said NCC President, the Dr. John Hartog, in a statement.

The discovery comes as Dallas-based tech company Colossal Biosciences works to resurrect the long-extinct woolly mammoth using DNA preserved from frozen fossils.

Colossal launched last September with $15 million in seed funding, but has since raised another $60 million from a star-studded group of venture capitalists, including Paris Hilton and the billionaire ‘Jurassic World’ producer. Thomas Tull.

George Church, co-founder of Colossal Biosciences and a Harvard University geneticist, has compared mammoths to the “cuddly version of a velociraptor.”

“They’re vegetarians, they’re not threatening,” he said on a call announcing the round in which Fortune was participating.

“I’m all for mammoths,” co-founder Ben Lamm said in the same virtual meeting, sitting in front of a shelf lined with a number of models of the prehistoric creature.

The company plans to take mammoth DNA that has been frozen in ice for thousands of years and combine it with modern Asian elephant genetic material to create a hybrid animal that looks the most like to the extinct creature.

Through the creation of the “Arctic Elephants,” as Church calls them, the society aims to help slow climate change and provide a gold mine of research opportunities in areas such as genetics and genetics. genome editing.

Key to the company’s climate change ambitions is its plan to restore permafrost in the tundras of several continents.

Due to their size, the mammoths were constantly trampling on new layers of snow, insulating the ground and allowing the permafrost to remain frozen. At the current rate of atmospheric warming, these areas are melting and releasing environmentally harmful carbon dioxide.

The creatures would also cut down trees and clear a path for other large animals to continue packing snow, which could turn entire forests into grasslands – which Church says is more efficient for photosynthesis and carbon sequestration. .

“We are making the path to species de-extinction and preservation a reality by bringing the planet one step closer to reversing the downward trend of ecosystem degradation and staggering biodiversity loss through cutting-edge genetic tools” , Lamm said in a statement. Fortune.

WOOLLY MAMMOTHS EXPLAINED: THESE GIANT MAMMALS CROWDED THE EARTH DURING THE PLEISTOCENE 10,000 YEARS AGO

The woolly mammoth roamed the frozen tundra of Europe and North America for 140,000 years, disappearing at the end of the Pleistocene, 10,000 years ago.

They are one of the best understood prehistoric animals known to science because their remains are often not fossilized but frozen and preserved.

Males were about 12 feet (3.5 m) tall, while females were slightly smaller.

The curved tusks were up to 16 feet (5 m) long, and their bellies sported a coat of shaggy hair up to 3 feet (1 m) long.

Tiny ears and short tails prevented the loss of vital body heat.

Their trunks had “two fingers” at the end to help them pick grass, twigs and other vegetation.

The woolly mammoth is one of the best understood prehistoric animals known to science because their remains are often not fossilized but frozen and preserved (artist's impression)

The woolly mammoth is one of the best understood prehistoric animals known to science because their remains are often not fossilized but frozen and preserved (artist’s impression)

They get their name from the Russian “mammut,” or earth mole, because the animals were believed to live underground and die on contact with light, which is why they were always found dead and half-buried.

Their bones were once believed to belong to extinct races of giants.

Woolly mammoths and modern elephants are closely related, sharing 99.4% of their genes.

The two species went down separate evolutionary paths six million years ago, around the same time humans and chimpanzees went their own way.

Woolly mammoths coexisted with early humans, who hunted them for food and used their bones and tusks to craft weapons and art.

Alice F. Ponder